elevation_-_3rd_leg_-_north_america

October 12, 2001 - Montreal, Quebec, Canada - Molson Centre

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Opening Act(s): Garbage

Setlist:

Elevation, Beautiful Day, Until The End Of The World, New Year’s Day, Out Of Control, Sunday Bloody Sunday, When Will I See You Again-Stuck In A Moment You Can’t Get Out Of, Kite, Angel Of Harlem, Staring At The Sun, Bad-40, Where The Streets Have No Name, Mysterious Ways, Pride (In The Name Of Love). Encore: Bullet The Blue Sky, What’s Going On, New York, With Or Without You, One, Peace On Earth-Walk On.

Remarks:

After a big shakeup in South Bend, tonight’s setlist reverts back to the familiar 1st and 2nd leg order. Bono brings a pregnant fan up on stage tonight and kisses her belly when she lifts her shirt for him. Lyrics in ‘New York’ are again changed througout the song, similarly to the Notre Dame show two nights ago.

Media Review:

Montreal Gazette

U2 Hasn’t Changed Since Their Last Visit But The World Has

by T’Cha Dunlevy

Many wondered what would have changed in U2’s show since the Irish supergroup last performed in Montreal. U2 played to a sold-out crowd of 20,000 at the Molson Centre last night, less than five months after accomplishing the same feat two nights in a row May 27-28. The answer: U2 didn’t change at all. The world did.

It hit me yesterday afternoon as I listened to the band’s latest album Elevation [sic], specifically the whimsically penned ode turned poignant, poetic tearjerker New York.

It hit me again when they performed the song near the end of their two-hour set last night. It followed a surprisingly sensitive and distinctly U2-flavoured cover of Marvin Gaye’s poignant and poetic wake-up call What’s Going On?, the sugary lyric “War is not the answer / Only love can conquer hate” not failing to strike a chord.

The world changed, and so the show changed. The enormous, heart-shaped stage took on new meaning, as did the Beatles’s All You Need Is Love, played over the PA before the concert.

U2’s trademark epic sound served as a homing device. Bono’s innate showmanship instincts - his physical interactions with the crowd and his bandmembers, particularly his affectionate relationship with guitarist The Edge - came across more genuine than ever. And the band’s support of Amnesty International, Greenpeace and the Drop the Debt campaign all gained an added sense of purpose.

“Thank you for coming,” said Bono, finally, after With Or Without You. “We had a special time last time. We felt we wanted to stay with it. I’m really glad we did.

“You know, since September 11, the work we were doing, and that you were doing, doesn’t feel so left of centre. Somehow it feels … (long pause) it just feels really right.

“This crisis has its roots in poverty - in the poverty of the continent of Africa, where people feel the world has abandoned them. We don’t want to let crazy fanatics live off the poverty of these people.”

It was just another arena rock show, just another stop on a continuing tour for perhaps the biggest band in the world in the aftermath of a major world crisis.

And amid all the political talk and the real-life war that gets related to us in scattered, mediated, spin-laden tidbits, the very human act of reaching out by four guys who don’t have to care so much was genuinely touching.

Images:

All images are © Associated Press; © Carrie

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About this Entry

This page contains a single entry by Jonathan published on October 12, 2001 8:33 AM.

October 10, 2001 - South Bend, Indiana, USA - Joyce Center was the previous entry in this blog.

October 13, 2001 - Hamilton, Ontario, Canada - Copps Coliseum is the next entry in this blog.

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