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Bono: I've had glaucoma for past 20 years

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U2 frontman says his trademark dark glasses are due to chronic ocular condition that can make eyes more sensitive to light

by Hannah Ellis-Petersen, The Guardian

For two decades his insistence on wearing sunglasses, even when indoors, has been seen simply as part of his rockstar image.

But Bono, 54, has revealed that his trademark shades are instead there to alleviate difficulties caused by a chronic eye condition.

Speaking on BBC1's Graham Norton show, the U2 frontman explained that for the past 20 years he has had glaucoma, a condition that can make eyes more sensitive to light.

Asked by Norton whether he ever removes his shades, Bono replied: "This is a good place to explain to people that I've had glaucoma for the last 20 years. I have good treatments and I am going to be fine."

Post by U2.
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Bono and Ali Hewson at George Clooney's
wedding in Venice, Italy, Sept. 27, 2014

by Independent.ie

The U2 frontman has been married to Ali Hewson for 32 years and they have four children together. But the 54-year-old musician admits she still keeps him on his toes.

"When we're leaving for tour, my family is in very good humour which is a real worry because I'm thinking, 'Can't you cry?' My missus has been playing hard to get for quite a while now and she's an elusive character," he revealed to British newspaper The Sun.

"She's not easy to get to know and other people's praise holds not much sway for her. She's a very independent, smart kind of girl, who, I think, sees me as a figure of amusement. Most of the time, I enjoy her company."

Bono and his bandmates - The Edge, Adam Clayton and Larry Mullen Jr. - are used to travelling the world to perform their hits for fans. Amid this, the Beautiful Day singer keeps himself grounded by making sure he's in regular contact with his inner circle.

By Patrick Kevin Day, Los Angeles Times

So you were upset that Apple sent you the new U2 album to your iTunes, even though you didn't ask for it. Now what?

On Thursday night's "Conan," Conan O'Brien aired a possible new solution for Apple to utilize against the surprising backlash to the giveaway.

As the fake Apple executive "Marcus Pratt" says in the bit, "Apparently, to today's youth, giving away a free album from one of the best bands of all time is like going to their house and taking a gigantic crap on their doorstep."

Dave Urbanski, The Blaze

For the last several Christmas Eves, U2′s Bono has appeared on the streets of Dublin to "busk" (i.e., sing/perform in exchange for donations) on behalf of a charity that helps the homeless.

This Christmas Eve was no different, as a wild crowd gathered around Bono and Irish songwriter Glen Hansard -- who plays for The Frames and The Swell Season and starred in the 2007 film "Once," winning an Oscar for Best Original Song ("Falling Slowly") -- while the pair prepared to sing and play without amplification.

No worries. The rowdy group erupted, drowning out Bono's voice on the chorus to "Merry Xmas Everybody," a 1973 song by the English group Slade. The mood was electric.

'A great, great poet who changed my life' - Bono

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by the Irish Independent

Bono described Seamus Heaney as "a great, great poet" who "changed my life".

"In so many things he was a gentle genius, whose words challenged us with the grit and beauty of life as much as they gave us solace. He wrote with a brevity that strangely spilled to the brim," he said.

"We all envied how he made that most complicated of things, the balancing of work and family, appear so simple. In Marie he found his other whole. And it is a joy to be around his kids. . . Michael, Chris and Catherine Ann. They have all of his humility in their sharpness."

And Bono revealed he carried Heaney's poetry with him, including on a recent trip to Liberia. "I'm bewildered to think Seamus is no longer with us. Because his words will be around forever, it seemed so would he."

Actor Liam Neeson also said: "He crafted, through his poetry, who we are as a species. By doing so, he defined our place in the universe. May he rest in peace."

© Independent.ie

SIR MICK JAGGER is planning to call U2 frontman BONO to ask his advice ahead of THE ROLLING STONES' headline performance at Glastonbury in June (13).

by Express.co.uk

The Irish rockers famously axed a slot at the legendary music event in 2010 after singer Bono sustained a serious back injury, but they returned to headline the following summer (11).

The Rolling Stones are following in the band's footsteps by playing their first ever slot at the festival this summer (13), and Jagger wants to talk to Bono about his experience there.

He tells the BBC, "'Don't do it!' might be his advice, but it's a bit late for that. It is quite a difficult gig. U2 had terrible weather and that didn't help. You have to learn from their experiences."

The Rolling Stones will complete a North American tour before taking to the stage at Glastonbury, but Jagger insists the veteran rockers will have some time off after wrapping the U.S. shows.

He adds, "You gotta pace yourself. We have enough time before we come back to England, so we'll be well recovered."

(Hear Mick Jagger talk about this on BBC.co.uk)

Julian Lennon says the U2 singer's eye condition is worsening

NME

Julian Lennon, son of The Beatles' John Lennon, has revealed that Bono's eyesight is deteriorating.

The U2 frontman has admitted in the past that he requires his trademark sunglasses because he suffers from an eye condition which makes him over-sensitive to light, but now his friend Julian Lennon has confirmed the condition is worsening.

He told the Irish Daily Star: "Bono actually has a condition with his eyes. I don't know the exact issue but the brightness of the sun hurts them and it's a deteriorating issue."

However, Lennon admitted that he thinks the 'Where The Streets Have No Name' singer is lucky to suffer from a condition that can easily be made into a trademark style.

Bono and U2's search for God

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The Washington Times,

WASHINGTON, January 1, 2013 -- Humans have praised God through many means throughout our history. Science has ventured tentatively into these waters, but God remains a mystery, and some would argue that this is the way that it is meant to be.

My views on this are well documented: I believe that science has a role to play in our spiritual development - as Jacob Bronkowski said, knowledge is our destiny, and science's raison d'etre is surely to obtain that knowledge. Science and Religion don't have to be in opposition, they are sides of the one coin, and ultimately, if we foster the advance of both of them, their description of that coin must converge.

But because it is the new year, and perhaps a time to eschew controversy in favor of community, let me talk about music. Except in the most puritanical religions, music has always been one way that we have agreed we could seek to commune with God, and share our experience of that seeking. Gospel and hymns are the traditional forms of praise, but pop music is also gathering its own rich tradition.

To the surprise of many, U2, arguably the world's most popular rock band, is not afraid to release songs which have a spiritual emphasis. They wear their Christianity on their sleeves if you know where to look.

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