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"No one's blaming them," the drummer says. "Apple has done great things, but it has also contributed to the devaluation process [of music]"

by Jon Blistein, Rolling Stone

Pink Floyd drummer Nick Mason thinks that Apple "got off scot-free" following the mixed response to the way the tech giant distributed U2's latest album, Songs of Innocence. Speaking with the British edition of GQ, Mason noted how U2 bore the brunt of the negativity, apologizing to iTunes users for "forcing" the album on them.

Although Mason said that he, too, would have taken Apple up on an offer to release one of his albums in exchange for £50 million, the fallout from the release has "made everyone think again about how they want their music delivered, given or sold.

"Look, U2 are a great band, and Bono's an extraordinary individual, so this isn't an anti-U2 tirade," he continued. "But it highlights a vital aspect to the whole idea of music in the 21st century. What's also interesting is that Apple seem to have got off scot-free. No one's blaming them. Apple has done great things, but it has also contributed to the devaluation process."

BBC News

U2 frontman Bono says he fears that he may never play guitar again following a bike accident last November.

He made the comment in his A to Z of 2014, published on the band's website.

Bono broke his arm in six places and fractured his eye socket, hand and shoulder blade in what he called a "freak accident" in New York.

In the letter to his fans, he said he was unable to move around physically and would have to "concentrate hard" to be fit for U2's next tour.

At the time, the hospital where Bono was being treated said he had been involved in "a high-energy bicycle accident when he attempted to avoid another rider".

The Irish rocker spoke this week about being on painkillers for weeks and said he had a "massive injury, I can't blame on anyone but myself".

No Christmas eve busking from Bono in 2014

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Bono, who has been recovering from a serious bicycle accident, did not attend the annual Christmas eve busking on Dublin's Grafton street this year, but was spotted with Shane MacGowan outside The Cliff Townhouse on St Stephens Green. Bono's wife Ali Hewson as well as bandmate Larry Mullen were accompanying him. Bono's left arm was in a heavy cast. Check out a photo here and here.

By Kevin Rutherford, Radio.com

As U2 announces a sizable North American tour for 2015, guitarist The Edge is confirming that Bono, who recently injured himself in a bicycle accident and has been out of commission since, is going to be just fine by then--even though he may have to miss some appearances in the process, including KROQ's Almost Acoustic Christmas later this month.

The rocker called in to CBS Radio station KROQ's Kevin & Bean Show this morning (Dec. 3) to discuss the incident, as well as the tour.

"He managed to come out of it with what you could only describe as injuries from a car crash, literally, multiple fractures of bones in his elbow and in his back," The Edge said. "But he's doing OK."

Don't worry--though his injuries, which included multiple fractures (chiefly a facial fracture affecting the orbit of his eye and a humerus bone fracture in his left arm that tore through the skin), may have been severe, at least he was wearing a helmet.

By Marc Schneider, Billboard

Bono just can't catch a break, can he? On the mend after suffering a nasty fall from his bike earlier this month, the rocker and his band U2 have topped GQ's highly influential Least Influential People of 2014 list.

As you can expect, the mag slices into Bono (the "Tom Friedman of rock") and the boys for colluding with Apple to plop their new album, Songs of Innocence, into everyone's iTunes library, unsolicited and free of charge. "The worst part was the way both Apple and U2 treated this, like it was some kind of noble gift to The People; in fact this was a $100 million marketing campaign," GQ writes. "Yes, $100 million to turn U2's socially conscious dad-rock into a piece of direct mail."

Bono's cycling accident was more serious than previously thought, with the singer having to endure five hours of surgery for his injuries.

by Aoife Kelly, Irish Independent

U2's frontman was involved in a bike accident in Central Park, New York on Sunday and new details have emerged on the extent of his injuries.

According to Rolling Stone Bono crashed when he attempted to avoid another cyclist and was involved in a "high energy bicycle accident".

He was rushed to New York Presbyterian/Well Cornell Medical Center where he underwent five hours of surgery.

The magazine list his injuries as including a "facial fracture involving the orbit of his eye", three fractures of his left shoulder blade, a fracture of his little finger, and a fracture of his left humerus with the "bone shattering in six different places and tearing through his skin".

Speaking to Rolling Stone, orthopedic trauma surgeon Dean Lorich, MD, said that a "nerve trapped in the break was moved and the bone repaired with three metal plates and 18 screws".

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O'Connor (left) at the Band Aid 30 recording on Saturday

The singer also targeted Miley Cyrus, Lady Gaga and Prince in new interview

by Kory Grow, Rolling Stone

Sinéad O'Connor wishes her countrymen in U2 had just put out their latest album, Songs of Innocence, rather than pushing it onto people involuntarily. "What they did with iTunes was a badly judged move," the singer recently told The Daily Mail. "There was something almost terrorist about it. I'm really not a U2 fan but it wasn't at all kosher invading people's lives like that. It was bad management."

O'Connor participated in the interview ostensibly to promote her involvement in Band Aid 30, an update of the charity recording project Band Aid, which recorded "Do They Know It's Christmas?" in 1984. Boomtown Rats frontman Bob Geldof originally started Band Aid to raise money for people affected by famine; Band Aid 30 will raise money to fight Ebola in west Africa. (U2 frontman Bono is also one of the singers who participated in Band Aid 30.)

"I'm involved for one reason alone, and that's because I love Bob," O'Connor said in the interview. "If he ever asked me to mop his kitchen floor I would, willingly."

"It looks like we will have to do our 'Tonight Show' residency another time," the band said. "We're one man down"

by Jason Newman, Rolling Stone

U2 was forced to postpone their upcoming, weeklong residency on The Tonight Show Starring Jimmy Fallon after Bono underwent surgery for a cycling injury.

"It looks like we will have to do our Tonight Show residency another time - we're one man down," the band wrote on their website. "Bono has injured his arm in a cycling spill in Central Park and requires some surgery to repair it. We're sure he'll make a full recovery soon, so we'll be back! Much thanks to Jimmy Fallon and everyone at the show for their understanding."

It's unclear which groups will replace the band and when the Songs of Innocence rockers will return to The Tonight Show. A representative for U2 declined to elaborate on the incident past the band's statement.

By Andrea Rothman and Richard Weiss, Bloomberg

A private jet carrying Irish rock star Bono, the frontman of U2, had its baggage door shear off mid-flight during a trip between Dublin and Berlin.

The hatch and bags from the Bombardier Inc. (BBD/B) Learjet disappeared over German territory during the flight yesterday, Germany's air accident investigation bureau said. The jet landed safely at Berlin's Schoenefeld airport at 12.26 p.m.

"A door on the plane to the cargo hold became detached, and apparently two pieces of luggage fell out," the bureau said. "Bono was on board. We are investigating the incident."

The Learjet's baggage compartment is located in a rear section that's separate from the passenger compartment, said Paul Hayes, a safety expert at London-based Ascend. Since the hold isn't pressurized, passengers would have been in no danger of being sucked out of the jet when the door opened, he said.

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NIN's Trent Reznor with Bono at the 2005 Grammys

by Brett Buchanan, Alternative Nation

Nine Inch Nails frontman Trent Reznor discussed U2's Song of Innocence being released via Apple's iTunes in an interview with Billboard. Reznor defended Bono and U2, while acknowledging the mistakes that were made with the release strategy.

"As an artist, when I make a piece of music, I'd like you to know it's out there. I don't want to force it down your throat, but I would like you to know that if you'd like to, you might brush against it -- it exists somewhere. So I can see the incentive behind what they wanted to do. I was with Bono that day. I was at the Apple event and we were hanging out after they did it. There's an immense sense of pride toward the album he just spent several years making. He was very proud of what he did.

I think the misstep was the wording: If it would've been, 'Here it is, if you want it, come grab it...' I am assuming the momentum of that situation led to the oversight in not thinking that people might feel intruded upon."

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