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Bono blasts Republican nominee for trying to "run off with the American dream"

By Jon Blistein, Rolling Stone

U2 mocked Donald Trump and his proposed border wall before performing "Bullet the Blue Sky" at a concert in San Francisco on Wednesday.

The new bit called "Liberty..." found Bono condescending to clips of the Republican nominee touting his vast wealth and plans to build a great wall on the Mexican border. "Now candidate, you understand it's not just Mexican people who are going to have a problem with this wall of yours," Bono said. "It's everyone who loves the idea of America."

Bono spins Republican's gloomy rhetoric into optimistic message at Las Vegas concert

By Daniel Kreps, Rolling Stone

Days after Bono labeled Donald Trump as "potentially the worst idea that ever happened to America," U2 spun the Republican nominee's gloomy rhetoric into an optimistic message during their performance of "Desire" Friday at the iHeartRadio Festival in Las Vegas.

Juxtaposing footage of a Trump's pandering plea to black voters with Las Vegas' dice-rolling reputation, Bono asked the crowd, "Are you ready to gamble your car?" before sampling the Trump sound bite "What do you have to lose?" The singer then asks the crowd "Are you ready to gamble the American Dream," which was followed by video of Trump's assertion that "the American Dream is dead."

"The American Dream is alive," Bono then shouted to the crowd before returning to "Desire."

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"We remember that peace is not just the absence of violence. Peace is love organized," Bono says from the Vegas stage. "So get out and vote, whoever you're voting for."

By Katie Atkinson, Billboard

When U2 hit the stage as the final act of the iHeartRadio Music Festival on Friday night, they kicked right into the 1988 Rattle and Hum single "Desire" -- perfectly fitting the show's Las Vegas venue with its themes of bright lights and big money. And sure enough, Sin City imagery like showgirls, slot machines and poker tables flashed above the legendary Irish rockers to drive the point home.

But as the song continued, and its lyrical message became clearer, another theme emerged: the American presidential election and rocky cultural climate -- a theme also addressed by fellow iHeartRadio Fest performer Drake earlier in the evening.

"She's the dollars, she's my protection/ Yeah, she's the promise in the year of election," Bono sang, as the imagery suddenly shifted to a massive American flag. Then Donald Trump appeared onscreen timed with the lyrics "Like a preacher stealin' hearts at a travellin' show/ For love or money, money, money, money, money, money..." as fake dollars rained over the T-Mobile Arena crowd and Bono repeated the M-word seemingly 100 times.

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The international donor conference hopes to raise $13 billion (U.S.) to replenish the Global Fund for the fight against AIDS, tuberculosis and malaria.

By The Canadian Press

MONTREAL--Canada is a leader when it comes to collaborating on global issues, rock star Bono said Saturday during his keynote address at a Montreal conference to fundraise for AIDS, malaria and tuberculosis.

"It's just great to see Canada leading on this," he said. "You've always been ahead of the curve in realizing we can do more if the international community works together and subsuming your ego into the grand plan."

Bono was joined onstage by UN Secretary General Ban Ki-moon and billionaire philanthropist Bill Gates on the second and final day of an international donor conference that hoped to raise US$13 billion to replenish the Global Fund for the fight against the three major infectious diseases.

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by Billboard/Associated Press

U2 frontman Bono brought his star power to Capitol Hill Tuesday as he called on members of Congress to take swift action to deal with the global refugee crisis and violent extremism.

In testimony before a Senate subcommittee, Bono drew a bleak picture as he described the flood of people fleeing their homes in the Middle East, Asia and Africa. The human torrent threatens the very idea of European unity, he said, as he urged lawmakers to think of foreign aid as national security instead of charity.

"When aid is structured properly, with a focus on fighting poverty and improving governance, it could just be the best bulwark we have against the extremism of our age," Bono said.


ABC Breaking News | Latest News Videos

By Katie Kindelan, ABC News

U2 frontman Bono is using his spotlight to shine a light on the plight of refugees, calling the refugee crisis a "global problem."

"We now know that what goes on in the Middle East or North Africa this year will spill onto the streets of Paris or Brussels next year and, God forbid, onto the streets of America," Bono said today on "Good Morning America," referring to the recent terrorist attacks in Brussels and Paris.

"We cannot separate ourselves from what's going on in the outside world anymore. It's our world. That's what comes with globalization," he said. "With global impact, we've got responsibilities."

The 55-year-old rocker spoke to "GMA" from the Zaatari refugee camp in Jordan, home to approximately 80,000 refugees, mostly from Syria.

Late Breaking News: U2 is officially in a safe location, following an outbreak of terrorism in Paris earlier on Friday. All reports are, from other U2 fan sites (U2Achtung, @U2, etc.), that their fans are safe. If you are in Paris, please do not queue up by any means, as there is a state of emergency happening still. The GA-midnight check-in is absolutely cancelled until further notice. Do not attempt to travel to Paris or France at this time. Thank you, and on behalf of U2Station.com, our prayers go out to the people of France.

Rock star, currently touring with his band, will be in Ottawa to discuss African aid initiatives with NGOs

CBC News

U2 rock star and philanthropist Bono will meet with Prime Minister Stephen Harper, NDP Leader Tom Mulcair and Liberal Leader Justin Trudeau following a session with several non-profit organizations in Ottawa on Monday.

Stuart Hickox, founder of the non-profit "social marketing" organization One Change, confirmed Bono is coming to the capital for talks focused on aid in Africa, and is expected to attend question period following that meeting.

The Prime Minister's Office confirmed the meeting between Harper and Bono will take place Monday afternoon. Harper is expected to discuss his maternal and child health initiative, which he has previously discussed before the United Nations General Assembly.

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U2 singer wades into row over Apple and Irish state aid - and says that capitalism and commerce play a vital role in lifting people out of poverty

by Rupert Neate and Dorian Lynskey, The Guardian/The Observer

From stadium-packing rock star to champion of the impoverished, Bono has fronted a band and causes that have endeared him to millions. But the U2 frontman is likely to alienate more people than he wins over with his latest rallying cry: backing Ireland's corporate tax regime.

In an interview with the Observer, the Irish singer says his country's controversial policies - which help multinational companies avoid billions in tax - have "brought our country the only prosperity we've known".

The 54-year-old says that Ireland's economy is dependent on attracting multinational companies - including Apple, Facebook, Google and Amazon - with tax avoidance strategies, including a loophole dubbed the "Double Irish", the use of two Irish companies to lower the effective tax rate.

The Church of U2

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Photograph by Clemens Rikken/Hollandse-Hoogte/Redux

by Joshua Rothman, The New Yorker

A few years ago, I was caught up in a big research project about contemporary hymns (or "hymnody," as they say in the trade). I listened to hundreds of hymns on Spotify; I interviewed a bunch of hymn experts. What, I asked them, was the most successful contemporary hymn--the modern successor to "Morning Has Broken" or "Amazing Grace"? Some cited recently written traditional church hymns; others mentioned songs by popular Christian musicians. But one scholar pointed in a different direction: "If you're willing to construe the term 'hymn' liberally, then the most heard, most successful hymn of the last few decades could be 'I Still Haven't Found What I'm Looking For,' by U2."

Most people think of U2 as a wildly popular rock band. Actually, they're a wildly popular, semi-secretly Christian rock band. In some ways, this seems obvious: a song on one recent album was called "Yahweh," and where else would the streets have no name? But even critics and fans who say that they know about U2's Christianity often underestimate how important it is to the band's music, and to the U2 phenomenon. The result has been a divide that's unusual in pop culture. While secular listeners tend to think of U2's religiosity as preachy window dressing, religious listeners see faith as central to the band's identity. To some people, Bono's lyrics are treacly platitudes, verging on nonsense; to others, they're thoughtful, searching, and profound meditations on faith.

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