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by Greg Kot, Chicago Tribune

Montreal -- Bono and Adam Clayton are sitting on a couch in a downtown hotel last week after a U2 concert, talking T-shirts. Suddenly they're 17 years old again hanging out at punk clubs in their hometown of Dublin, circa 1977.

"The Ramones, the Clash, the Buzzcocks," says Clayton, the band's bassist, reminiscing about the bands that he, Bono and the other future members of U2 -- guitarist the Edge and drummer Larry Mullen Jr. -- witnessed and drew inspiration from as teenagers.

"The Buzzcocks -- the melodies were so great," Bono says, mimicking Pete Shelley furiously strumming a guitar. "What was their drummer's name (John Maher)? Larry used one of his parts on one of our songs."

"I took a few things from (the Stranglers') JJ Burnel - a great bass player," Clayton adds.

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Memories and megascreens: the band breaks down their arena takeover from the ceiling to the set lists

By Andy Greene, Rolling Stone

It's about 25 hours before U2 kick off their Innocence + Experience tour at Vancouver's Rogers Arena and Bono is sitting on a plush couch in a backstage lounge near the Edge. He's fiddling with a laptop and looking at a CDR recorded at a recent tour rehearsal. Right outside the door, walkie talkie-wielding tour personnel frantically run about as they prepare for the big night, but Bono seems completely relaxed. Adam Clayton walks in, hands him a cup of tea and then vanishes. We're instructed to sit between Bono and the Edge, knowing their schedule is insanely tight and they only have 20 minutes to chat.

We have 21 questions prepared, but since Bono isn't a man known for his brevity, we only manage to ask about eight. But the band manages to cover a lot of ground - even if we don't get to discuss the status of Songs of Experience or see if they're finally willing to cave and perform super rarities "Acrobat" and "Drowning Man" at some point on the tour.

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They're the biggest band on Earth, but for U2 that's not enough

by Rolling Stone

U2, the biggest band left on Earth, make their latest appearance on the cover of Rolling Stone in our new issue, hitting stands Friday. In the cover feature, senior writer Brian Hiatt trails the band to Dublin and the French Riviera, where he shares pints of Guinness and a long, boozy dinner with Bono; watches an intimate full-band rehearsal in a Monaco basement; and hangs out in Bono and the Edge's oceanfront houses. At our cover shoot, photographer Mark Seliger captured a stunning video of Bono and the Edge playing "The Miracle (of Joey Ramone)" acoustic, with Bono pounding out drum parts on Edge's guitar:

The band is highly aware of what Bono calls the "shitstorm" over the iTunes giveaway of their new album, Songs of Innocence. Bono says he didn't understand that the album would automatically download itself onto some people's phones. "It's like we put a bottle of milk in people's fridge that they weren't asking for," he says. "It is a gross invasion!" He smiles. "But it was kind of an accident. The milk was supposed to be in the cloud. It was supposed to be on the front doorstep."

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In case you missed it, all four members of U2 recorded an acoustic live session on Jo Whiley's BBC Radio 2 Show at Maida Vale in London on October 15. The band was also interviewed by Jo Whiley. Listen to U2 performing "The Miracle", "Every Breaking Wave", "Cedarwood Road", "Song for Someone" and "Stuck in a Moment":

Interviewed earlier today (October 16, 2014) on the Lauren Laverne's radio show on BBC Radio 6. The full 20 minute audio interview is presented below.

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U2's new manager Guy Oseary and Bono

By Andrew Hampp, Billboard

It has been a whirlwind nine months for Guy Oseary since he took the reins of U2's management after longtime manager Paul McGuinness announced his retirement last fall. That includes a Golden Globe, an Oscar nomination, a big Super Bowl campaign and the premiere of The Tonight Show in support of two songs that ultimately didn't make the final cut on Songs of Innocence, the history-making album that debuted to 500 million iTunes customers on Sept. 9.

With lead single "The Miracle (Of Joey Ramone)" set to be featured in a massive media campaign from Apple, valued at $100 million by multiple sources, U2 has already scored arguably the biggest launch in music history. And it's one that's already fraught with a little controversy, from angry retailers to Grammy and SoundScan guidelines. Oseary, 41, rang Billboard on Sept. 11 to address the many questions about the launch, and what's next (another album?) from this landmark deal with Apple.

By Tim Molloy, The Wrap News

Rock gods have the same awkward interactions with panhandlers that you do.

U2 guitarist The Edge, producer of Friday night's MTV special on youth homelessness, "The Break," says he, too, sometimes finds himself at a loss about how to help people on the street.

"There's that awful thing where you realize there's nothing you can do, right at that moment, so you kind of pretend they're not there," he told TheWrap. "And I think for somebody who's homeless, particularly someone who's panhandling, that's the most emotionally difficult thing, is to become like a non-person. Like you literally do not exist to someone walking by.

Discussions: U2

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Written by Sean Highkin & Liam Demamiel, One Thirty BPM

Sean Highkin and Liam Demamiel delve into the sprawling catalog and career of U2 in our next Discussions feature.

LIAM DEMAMIEL: Most U2 conversations invariably end up on the subject of Bono, and I can't really think of any other frontman who polarizes listeners as much as the man in the sunglasses. I know we are both big U2 fans, what are your thoughts on him?

SEAN HIGHKIN: I can sort of see why he's such a divisive figure. There is a strong contingent of rock fans that can't stand rock stars who have aspirations beyond being entertainers. I don't get it myself. The amount of money and awareness Bono has used his celebrity to raise for poverty, hunger, and AIDS is unparalleled in the pop music. People see him acting all buddy-buddy with world leaders and roll their eyes, because our first reaction when we see someone worth hundreds of millions of dollars talking about hunger in Africa is to question their intentions. But I don't think anyone can argue that Bono hasn't done a whole heck of a lot of good for society as a rock star.

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